Tag: leadership

What else can I get for you?

First things first, here’s your formal introduction to Ellis Berry. Born on January 3rd at 2:49pm. He weighed 9 lbs 14 oz and 21 inches long at birth. I can confidently say we’re all in love over here.

We experienced a lot of really amazing care from everyone during our hospital stay – nurses, doctors, acupuncturists, nursing assistants, room cleaning folks, you name it. It’s been exactly what we’ve needed to get through these last few emotion-filled days.

What I’ve noticed is that we were constantly asked, “What else can I get for you?” by these folks. And they mean it. It’s not a yes or no question, because we’re all “fine” and don’t need any other help because we don’t want to put anybody out or be a burden or all those other things we tell ourselves because we don’t want to ask for help. And it’s because these people who work at this hospital are working in a culture where they really want to help.

It’s pushed me to realize there is zero reason why I shouldn’t do that every day as an HR professional and as a leader. Think about the millions of applicable ways you can fit that question into your world.

Here are a couple from mine:

  • Employee has a question about X benefit. You answer exactly what they ask. But benefits are tricky sometimes. You ask them what other questions they have about it. You just opened a door that will all you to make them confident on something that impacts their lives. With one extra question.
  • As a leader, you try to meet with your employees regularly, right? Maybe it tends to be just a bunch of status or project updates or maybe it’s a difficult conversation for one or both of you. Before that meeting is over, what if you said, “What else do you need from me?” after every single meeting? (To be fair, I’m stealing this example from a couple of incredible leaders I’ve had.) That builds a partnership and a piece of support that encourages your employee to feel comfortable asking you for help.

In both examples, you will build trust. You’ll be able to better help the next person. You can begin to identify areas of improvement in what you, your team or your company does. You’ll be able to keep open lines of communication and foster so much more collaboration.

As long as you’re genuine and authentic in asking, I don’t know how you could possibly go wrong with asking just one more question.

2017 in Review

I’ve been reflecting so much on the past year. I’m usually in the camp that moves forward at 12:01am on January 1 because, hey, that stuff is in the past. This year was different for all sorts of reasons, some personal and others professional. There were amazing things, many amazing things.

There were some not great, heartbreaking, absolutely crushing things. I breezed my way through some things. I limped through others. And there were even some that I pretended didn’t even happen because it was easier that way. Or maybe I clicked the like button on Facebook when someone I knew was leading a march for justice of any kind or I clicked on the sad face when someone was assaulted or murdered because of their color or gender or beliefs. That’s not me. And if it is, I want and need to change that.

2017 had some things that definitely fell into the Giant Thumbs Up category.

  1. I stood up in front of 500+ of our employees during our annual meeting and got to see the reaction on their faces when we announced two amazing new benefits: six weeks of paid parental leave and a paid day off on your birthday. I have a fear of public speaking. For real. But I liked it a lot. Challenge accepted and won. I’m ready for more.
  2. We finally, on our last attempt at creating a human that would have been mostly covered by insurance, managed to conceive our soon-to-be baby boy. There were strings upon strings of follies that we ran into during this round of insemination, so it wasn’t too shocking that it worked. I’ve decided that Science + Prayer = Miracle. I can’t wait to meet him.
  3. I went to #SHRM17 and because more involved in social media surrounding HR life. It’s been slow going for me to find relationships with people in my field for many years. I managed to find this crew of folks that know and understand what a day in the life of my job often is has been phenomenal when it comes to expanding my knowledge in HR. I still have infinitely more to learn about this world and it’s easier to do it when you surround yourself with others you connect with and believe in.
  4. I read more. After I graduated with my BA in 2016, I vowed to read more and I did. True crime may very well still be my favorite, but I’m also a sucker for a good memoir, the occasional self help book and a sprinkling of chick lit. YES, I ADMITTED TO THAT. You can find something in everything you read that will open your eyes to someone else’s world.

2018 will undoubtedly come with its own mountain of challenges. One is scheduled to be here on January 3rd and will be a challenge for 18 more years. The rest, I’m as ready as I can be for them, whatever that might look like. I’m with each of you in any way you need it.

Happy New Year, friends. Let’s take ’18 and own it.

Sneak peak of Challenge J Berry:

Less creepy alien picture coming soon.

Leadership Lessons from a Four-Time WNBA Championship Team

 

I went to Game 5 of the WNBA Finals a couple of weeks ago to keep tabs on my Minnesota Lynx and make sure they won the 2017 WNBA Championship. They did. You’re welcome. I had goosebumps from the minute we got our seats. Pretty sure my deodorant stopped working, so I tweeted about it. I almost chewed a hole in the giveaway shirt we got because a score that close in the last two minutes is not my favorite thing. I was able to breathe once there were 57 seconds left in the game and the Lynx were ahead by nine points. And really, I just wanted the Lynx to not even get close to any of the Sparks players because they are… something. The timeouts were killin’ me because listen. You are down by that many points? It’s not gonna happen and you’re just prolonging my high blood pressure from going back to a somewhat normal state. Okay – Lynx won. I was stressed out and trying to distract myself during the FIVE BILLION unnecessary timeouts and really terrible halftime show, so, you know, I was thinkin’ about HR-type stuff. (Shut up.  I love it.)

Backstory for my non-WNBA friends: Lindsay Whalen is my favorite WNBA player, possibly my favorite athlete. She’s a 13 year veteran point guard of the WNBA, graduated from the University of Minnesota, got drafted by the Connecticut Sun, came back home to the Minnesota Lynx in 2010 and now has four championship rings. That’s the short story. Even shorter story: she’s a true leader in every since of the world. She’s not the taller player, the best shooter, or the fastest runner, but she doesn’t have to be. She just knows how all those things work together well and where she fits into the mix.

Here’s my favorite example over the course of the WNBA Finals: Game 4. Lynx are down 2-1 in the series. They lose again, they lose the Finals. Not an option for Whalen. 1:30 into the game and she flattens the Sparks point guard to put an end to a fast break and gets a flagrant foul called. The Sparks hit both their free throws. Didn’t matter. The energy that Whalen fueled by putting the stop to that play sent the Lynx into a place where they desperately needed to be and it sent the Sparks into the opposite direction. The Lynx won.

You’re thinking I’m just telling you this story because I like reliving the mental picture of Whalen clothes-lining another point guard. You’re half right. The other reason is because it’s a pretty great example of how a leader can let other people focus on their jobs while figuring out how to  make things better in ways that other people aren’t focusing on.

I don’t think anyone else on the team knew how to get that energy back, including the coach. They knew the gist of how to win a game: play hard, score points, shift the momentum, all those sportsing things. But Whalen knew that something had to give, and I’m pretty sure the court gave a little bit when that other player hit the floor. Not the most orthodox approach, but one that was worth trying because nothing else was working. And it did.

This isn’t a personal story or a work story. It’s a combo of two of my most favorite things and it’s an observation of what an amazing, hard working, in the trenches leader looks like from a different perspective. And it was awesome.

Don’t Lead with Bias. Just Stop.

This morning when I giving my 2 year old a frozen chocolate chip waffle, America’s elected leader was making an announcement via Twitter banning transgender people to serve in the U.S. military because it’s a “burden” and “distraction”. No, it’s not a surprise, but that change the fact that it’s damaging and dangerous.

Once again, individuals are impacted by someone who allows his personal opinions affect the decisions he makes as a leader. This article is a couple of years old, but it doesn’t take away the accuracy of it or the way that it almost describes the current administration’s decision making over the past six months. I’m sure there are more than Five Common Unconscious Biases That Lead To Bad Decisions, but this is a really great start. If you don’t want to read the article and think about how closely it relates to the person that lives part-time in the White House, then read it and apply it to your own decisions that you have to make as a leader or as an HR professional. Here’s another article full of 7 Cognitive Biases That Impact Your Decision Making.

We often say biases are unconscious, but I don’t really know if that’s necessarily true. Merriam-Webster defines unconscious with other phrases like “not knowing”, “not aware”, “not deliberately planned out”, or “free from self-awareness”. The thing about all of those phrases is that each person, including you, has the power to eliminate things like that once you become aware of them.

You don’t always know what these biases are or one would assume you wouldn’t have them. If someone approaches you to call you out for your bias, hear them out. Listen to them. Understand them. Now your bias isn’t unconscious. It’s out in the open and you have privilege of being aware of it. You’re now equipped with the power to change it.

I know this doesn’t apply to everyone. There are people that will go to their grave with amazingly inappropriate biases that will make a negative impact every single day, but they’ll never acknowledge it. Those kind of people apparently wind up in the White House.