Tag: human resources

Starting Strong with Phone Interviews for Candidates

Love ’em or hate ’em, whether you’re a hiring for a job or looking for one, you’re bound to run in to a phone interview one of these days. It’s a introductory chat, kind of like those conversations you have at your friends’ barbecue with someone you don’t know – could be awkward and painful or it could be an opportunity to meet your new BFF.

For my talent acquisition/recruiting friends: your post is coming. Sometimes these phone interviews get incredibly routine and I get that. Regardless of how mundane they might feel, you’ve got a big responsibility to get these things right!

For my jobseeker friends: the rest of this is for you. If you want an invitation to meet someone in person, you gotta nail this phone interview.

Things You Should Do (especially if the phone interview is with me):

  • Be ready. When you schedule it, make sure you’re actually available at that time. And please make sure that you’re somewhere with solid phone reception where there aren’t going to be a lot of distractions.
  • Do your research. Refresh your memory on the actual job you applied for and do a little bit of homework about the company. An answer of “not too much” when the recruiter asks you what you know about the company or the job is 9 million percent not cool.
  • Understand your own experience and how it matches the role. Does the position ask for someone with customer service experience and you’ve worked in childcare your whole life? That is some serious customer service experience. Paranoid parents are not exactly peaches and I know this because I am one.
  • Get off your ass. Sit up. Stand up. Walk around. Those theories about walking meetings being more productive apply to phone interviews. You’ll sound better and project yourself clearer.
  • You better ask some questions, man, and you better put some thought into it. You always have questions. Don’t ask about the job description unless you have something very specific you want details on. This is a chance for you to engage the person on the other end of the phone. This is where you get to interview them to make sure they’re the right company for you.

Things You Should Not Do (especially if the phone interview is with me):

  • Don’t act surprised when the phone rings. You should already be prepared for the call and expecting it five minutes before it’s scheduled. You wouldn’t run into an in-person interview at the very last minute (I would hope), so treat this the same way.
  • Don’t act like the phone interview is a formality. In a way, it is. I’ll give you that. But it’s really likely that the person interviewing you has a strong relationship with the hiring manager and isn’t going to risk that by sending through someone that isn’t really engaged during this first talk regardless of how perfect your resume might look. We’re normally hiring for more than just a list of skills on a piece of paper.
  • Don’t oversell yourself. Confidence is rad. It’s encouraged, but you gotta be realistic. By stretching your actual skills in an unrealistic fashion, you’re not only wasting your time and the interviewer’s time, you’re going to fall hard on your face if you get hired and that’s not gonna feel good.
  • Don’t forget your manners. Thanks for the call. I appreciate your time. It was great to talk to you. I hope we can talk again soon. Those things set you apart. They indicate you’re a decent human. We like to hire decent humans.

I love conducting phone interviews. I really love awesome phone interviews. When I wrap up a phone interview I really loved, I immediately hang up the phone and call the hiring manager to let them know THIS IS THE ONE. And I want That One to be you!

Have other tips for phone interviewees? Have a phone interview coming up and want to chat through it? Comment below or shoot me an email! I’d be glad to chat.

Photo Credit: Wesley Quinn

What else can I get for you?

First things first, here’s your formal introduction to Ellis Berry. Born on January 3rd at 2:49pm. He weighed 9 lbs 14 oz and 21 inches long at birth. I can confidently say we’re all in love over here.

We experienced a lot of really amazing care from everyone during our hospital stay – nurses, doctors, acupuncturists, nursing assistants, room cleaning folks, you name it. It’s been exactly what we’ve needed to get through these last few emotion-filled days.

What I’ve noticed is that we were constantly asked, “What else can I get for you?” by these folks. And they mean it. It’s not a yes or no question, because we’re all “fine” and don’t need any other help because we don’t want to put anybody out or be a burden or all those other things we tell ourselves because we don’t want to ask for help. And it’s because these people who work at this hospital are working in a culture where they really want to help.

It’s pushed me to realize there is zero reason why I shouldn’t do that every day as an HR professional and as a leader. Think about the millions of applicable ways you can fit that question into your world.

Here are a couple from mine:

  • Employee has a question about X benefit. You answer exactly what they ask. But benefits are tricky sometimes. You ask them what other questions they have about it. You just opened a door that will all you to make them confident on something that impacts their lives. With one extra question.
  • As a leader, you try to meet with your employees regularly, right? Maybe it tends to be just a bunch of status or project updates or maybe it’s a difficult conversation for one or both of you. Before that meeting is over, what if you said, “What else do you need from me?” after every single meeting? (To be fair, I’m stealing this example from a couple of incredible leaders I’ve had.) That builds a partnership and a piece of support that encourages your employee to feel comfortable asking you for help.

In both examples, you will build trust. You’ll be able to better help the next person. You can begin to identify areas of improvement in what you, your team or your company does. You’ll be able to keep open lines of communication and foster so much more collaboration.

As long as you’re genuine and authentic in asking, I don’t know how you could possibly go wrong with asking just one more question.

The Robots are Coming. And They Might Bring Dennis Rodman.

They are. And as soon as they get here, there won’t be a need for people to work in HR departments. The robots have it under control and it will be glorious. (I’ve mentioned I speak fluent sarcasm, right?) There was a pretty great discussion about the shift of Artificial Intelligence into the Human Resource arena last week via the #NextChat twitter stream. The recap is on the SHRM blog if you’re really into that kinda thing.

The ATM just celebrated it’s 50th anniversary and there are now zero banks left in the world, thanks to John Shepherd-Barron. (FYI: The first one was at Barclays, which is the same company that’s installing sensors to see how often their employees are at their desks.) Robots have taken control of all of our money and will distribute it as the data sees fit. Please do not make eye contract with Robot Cashman. His infrared eyeballs will blind you and then turn you into a robot, too, which is actually pretty beneficial because then you’ll have a job!

The self-checkout made it’s appearance into the world back in the 1980s by a dude named David Humble. And since then, retail stores haven’t hired anyone at all because the machines are ALL OVER IT. You see those robots at Target all the time asking me if I’m finding everything okay six times in 20 minutes, making sure I have a RedCard so I can save 5% and stocking those damn end caps in such a beautiful, beautiful way that I want to buy everything.

Listen. I say this in jest, but it’s a fear that I’m pretty sure everyone has either felt or heard someone talk about at some point in their life. Probably 10 or 11 years ago, my BFF chastised me for using a self checkout at a grocery story because it would take away the cashier’s job. My bestie is not a conspiracy theory wackadoodle. My point in sharing what might embarrass her is this: IT’S OKAY TO BE NERVOUS.

Humans still need humans. That’s why I married my wife and not my quesadilla maker. The only thing that’s going to change is how those interactions happen. If I’m at my credit union and I need cash, but notice there’s a giant line in front me, I’m probably going to opt for the ATM in the lobby. But if I’m at my credit union (side note: here’s why you should join a credit union and ditch your big bank) and I need to figure out if I can get a better rate on my car loan, I’m going to talk to someone about it and I’m cool if the line is a little longer. A person is going to understand my situation much better than something that relies solely on artificial intelligence.

That works for HR, too. We’ll use AI to make sure we’re continuing to improve an applicant’s process, provide quicker responses to employee questions about their benefits or payroll and all that predictive analysis stuff that sounds super duper cool and helpful. But we’ll still use humans to do things like celebrate an employee’s 25th anniversary in a meaningful way, send an email to someone that works miles and miles away with a link to an article that reminded you of them, and spend more time developing, and, most importantly, take all the information we get from AI to make the workplace even better. See? It’s a gonna be a win for all us HR practitioners out there and we can’t be scared of it.

Dennis Rodman joined the Chicago Bulls back in 1995. He wasn’t much different in the 90s than he is now, minus palling around with Kim Jong-un. He wore dresses. He had a lot of tattoos. He punched a lot of people. I would imagine some of those championship level NBA players and coaches, along with millions of bandwagon Bulls were pretty terrified of that dude. He very well could have clocked Michael Jordan right in the face the very first day he walked into practice. But he didn’t. He was amazing and he helped the Bulls win three more NBA championships in a row.

See? It’s a gonna be a win for all us HR practitioners out there and we can’t be scared of it. If the greatest NBA player of all time (that’s Michael Jordan for you people that were incorrectly thinking Lebron what’s his name) can adapt to something scary and win some championships, then we can adapt to an addition to our daily lives that’s going to make us better, too.

What if we didn’t wait around in the locker room for AI to show up and throw his stuff in the locker next to ours? What kind of value could we bring our entire organizations if we proactively brought a case to our executive teams surrounding the benefits AI could bring from a business standpoint?