Month: January 2018

I’m Sorry I Didn’t Watch Your Video

I’m not considering myself an old dog right now because I do enjoy new tricks. Except SnapChat. I just don’t get it, you guys. And the filters freak out my toddler. That’s my caveat to this post.

I consume a lot of social media. It’s my screen time – Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn, blogs, etc. It fits my attention span of “hey, squirrel!” and I can pick it up and put it down when life needs my attention. I love it. I feel informed on what I want to be informed and learn more long the way. It works for me.

Here’s what doesn’t work for me: videos. I know they’re an up and coming trend, so I might have to get out my bifocals and succumb to the pressure. I get that. And I will.

I want to watch your video because you clearly have something of great value to share. I can see from the comments that people are getting a lot out of what they’ve heard! And I’m jelly. It feels awkward watching a video midway through the day at work or trying to keep the volume down low enough to not disturb my sleeping wife/toddler/infant, so I don’t. Here’s my idea:

Subtitles and/or a transcript of your video.

I know. It’s probably extra work. Someone had to type up everything. But once they do, I think your volume of exposure is going to increase. I really do.

With actual text, people can accurately quote you more to the masses. They can forward the link to your video knowing that there are multiple ways people can receive your message. We’re constantly seeing studies that people learn and retain in all different ways. And overall, now what you’re saying just became so much more accessible to so many more people.

I bookmark your videos and intend to watch them. In case I’m not able to grab the time to watch them, please consider this my apology for not watching it. I promise it’s not personal.

Photo by Peter Lewicki

Starting Strong with Phone Interviews for Candidates

Love ’em or hate ’em, whether you’re a hiring for a job or looking for one, you’re bound to run in to a phone interview one of these days. It’s a introductory chat, kind of like those conversations you have at your friends’ barbecue with someone you don’t know – could be awkward and painful or it could be an opportunity to meet your new BFF.

For my talent acquisition/recruiting friends: your post is coming. Sometimes these phone interviews get incredibly routine and I get that. Regardless of how mundane they might feel, you’ve got a big responsibility to get these things right!

For my jobseeker friends: the rest of this is for you. If you want an invitation to meet someone in person, you gotta nail this phone interview.

Things You Should Do (especially if the phone interview is with me):

  • Be ready. When you schedule it, make sure you’re actually available at that time. And please make sure that you’re somewhere with solid phone reception where there aren’t going to be a lot of distractions.
  • Do your research. Refresh your memory on the actual job you applied for and do a little bit of homework about the company. An answer of “not too much” when the recruiter asks you what you know about the company or the job is 9 million percent not cool.
  • Understand your own experience and how it matches the role. Does the position ask for someone with customer service experience and you’ve worked in childcare your whole life? That is some serious customer service experience. Paranoid parents are not exactly peaches and I know this because I am one.
  • Get off your ass. Sit up. Stand up. Walk around. Those theories about walking meetings being more productive apply to phone interviews. You’ll sound better and project yourself clearer.
  • You better ask some questions, man, and you better put some thought into it. You always have questions. Don’t ask about the job description unless you have something very specific you want details on. This is a chance for you to engage the person on the other end of the phone. This is where you get to interview them to make sure they’re the right company for you.

Things You Should Not Do (especially if the phone interview is with me):

  • Don’t act surprised when the phone rings. You should already be prepared for the call and expecting it five minutes before it’s scheduled. You wouldn’t run into an in-person interview at the very last minute (I would hope), so treat this the same way.
  • Don’t act like the phone interview is a formality. In a way, it is. I’ll give you that. But it’s really likely that the person interviewing you has a strong relationship with the hiring manager and isn’t going to risk that by sending through someone that isn’t really engaged during this first talk regardless of how perfect your resume might look. We’re normally hiring for more than just a list of skills on a piece of paper.
  • Don’t oversell yourself. Confidence is rad. It’s encouraged, but you gotta be realistic. By stretching your actual skills in an unrealistic fashion, you’re not only wasting your time and the interviewer’s time, you’re going to fall hard on your face if you get hired and that’s not gonna feel good.
  • Don’t forget your manners. Thanks for the call. I appreciate your time. It was great to talk to you. I hope we can talk again soon. Those things set you apart. They indicate you’re a decent human. We like to hire decent humans.

I love conducting phone interviews. I really love awesome phone interviews. When I wrap up a phone interview I really loved, I immediately hang up the phone and call the hiring manager to let them know THIS IS THE ONE. And I want That One to be you!

Have other tips for phone interviewees? Have a phone interview coming up and want to chat through it? Comment below or shoot me an email! I’d be glad to chat.

Photo Credit: Wesley Quinn

What else can I get for you?

First things first, here’s your formal introduction to Ellis Berry. Born on January 3rd at 2:49pm. He weighed 9 lbs 14 oz and 21 inches long at birth. I can confidently say we’re all in love over here.

We experienced a lot of really amazing care from everyone during our hospital stay – nurses, doctors, acupuncturists, nursing assistants, room cleaning folks, you name it. It’s been exactly what we’ve needed to get through these last few emotion-filled days.

What I’ve noticed is that we were constantly asked, “What else can I get for you?” by these folks. And they mean it. It’s not a yes or no question, because we’re all “fine” and don’t need any other help because we don’t want to put anybody out or be a burden or all those other things we tell ourselves because we don’t want to ask for help. And it’s because these people who work at this hospital are working in a culture where they really want to help.

It’s pushed me to realize there is zero reason why I shouldn’t do that every day as an HR professional and as a leader. Think about the millions of applicable ways you can fit that question into your world.

Here are a couple from mine:

  • Employee has a question about X benefit. You answer exactly what they ask. But benefits are tricky sometimes. You ask them what other questions they have about it. You just opened a door that will all you to make them confident on something that impacts their lives. With one extra question.
  • As a leader, you try to meet with your employees regularly, right? Maybe it tends to be just a bunch of status or project updates or maybe it’s a difficult conversation for one or both of you. Before that meeting is over, what if you said, “What else do you need from me?” after every single meeting? (To be fair, I’m stealing this example from a couple of incredible leaders I’ve had.) That builds a partnership and a piece of support that encourages your employee to feel comfortable asking you for help.

In both examples, you will build trust. You’ll be able to better help the next person. You can begin to identify areas of improvement in what you, your team or your company does. You’ll be able to keep open lines of communication and foster so much more collaboration.

As long as you’re genuine and authentic in asking, I don’t know how you could possibly go wrong with asking just one more question.

2017 in Review

I’ve been reflecting so much on the past year. I’m usually in the camp that moves forward at 12:01am on January 1 because, hey, that stuff is in the past. This year was different for all sorts of reasons, some personal and others professional. There were amazing things, many amazing things.

There were some not great, heartbreaking, absolutely crushing things. I breezed my way through some things. I limped through others. And there were even some that I pretended didn’t even happen because it was easier that way. Or maybe I clicked the like button on Facebook when someone I knew was leading a march for justice of any kind or I clicked on the sad face when someone was assaulted or murdered because of their color or gender or beliefs. That’s not me. And if it is, I want and need to change that.

2017 had some things that definitely fell into the Giant Thumbs Up category.

  1. I stood up in front of 500+ of our employees during our annual meeting and got to see the reaction on their faces when we announced two amazing new benefits: six weeks of paid parental leave and a paid day off on your birthday. I have a fear of public speaking. For real. But I liked it a lot. Challenge accepted and won. I’m ready for more.
  2. We finally, on our last attempt at creating a human that would have been mostly covered by insurance, managed to conceive our soon-to-be baby boy. There were strings upon strings of follies that we ran into during this round of insemination, so it wasn’t too shocking that it worked. I’ve decided that Science + Prayer = Miracle. I can’t wait to meet him.
  3. I went to #SHRM17 and because more involved in social media surrounding HR life. It’s been slow going for me to find relationships with people in my field for many years. I managed to find this crew of folks that know and understand what a day in the life of my job often is has been phenomenal when it comes to expanding my knowledge in HR. I still have infinitely more to learn about this world and it’s easier to do it when you surround yourself with others you connect with and believe in.
  4. I read more. After I graduated with my BA in 2016, I vowed to read more and I did. True crime may very well still be my favorite, but I’m also a sucker for a good memoir, the occasional self help book and a sprinkling of chick lit. YES, I ADMITTED TO THAT. You can find something in everything you read that will open your eyes to someone else’s world.

2018 will undoubtedly come with its own mountain of challenges. One is scheduled to be here on January 3rd and will be a challenge for 18 more years. The rest, I’m as ready as I can be for them, whatever that might look like. I’m with each of you in any way you need it.

Happy New Year, friends. Let’s take ’18 and own it.

Sneak peak of Challenge J Berry:

Less creepy alien picture coming soon.